Monthly Archives: December 2016

Publishing Update

We are just days away from a new short story out on the market. But (shh!) don’t tell. You can get it right now, for free by signing up for my email list. “See You Tomorrow” will be up for sale by the end of next week at the latest. The cover is currently with the cover designer, the ebook is formatted and ready to go. It’s just sitting. Waiting. Itching for people to read it.

I have mentioned a few times that I write in several genres. “See You Tomorrow” is in my adult Science Fiction genre, and it’s a Romance to boot. It’s a sweet story about Tammi, a Texas girl who runs into the handsome, blue-skinned, sharp-toothed alien Domino Sim in the off-limits part of a National Forest. They spend the entire summer together, but when his assignment on earth is unexpectedly cut short, Tammi spends the next fifteen years trying to prove to his people that mankind is worth their attentions. If she can’t get manned missions out of the solar system, she’ll never see Domino again.

I’m very excited for this short story, and while I’m here I might as well update you on how things are going with my other projects. I’m only a few thousand words from finishing up “Turning Point” which is Book 2 in the Afterdeath series. Sorry, Afterdeath lovers, you’ll have to wait a little longer. “Turning Point” won’t be out until early spring 2017, because as soon as I finish the rough draft I get to focus my mind on revisions of “Last Breath,” which should hit the shelves early next year. “Last Breath” is an Adult Scifi novel about a man stuck outside on a planet with an extremely deadly atmosphere. It’s a page-turner, filled with unexpected twists and turns, and plenty, (I mean plenty) of villains.

Be sure to sign up for my email list so you can get updates anytime a new book comes out. And you can smile a few days from now when everyone else is scrambling to buy their copy of “See You Tomorrow” and you already know how it ends. 😀

Have fun. And enjoy the writing.

3 ways to avoid inconsistency

Think… Monsters Inc. Remember that line, when Mike and Sully leave the apartment and Mike says to Sully, “You’ve been jealous of my looks since the fourth grade.” Remember that? Good.

Now, think… Monsters University. And how jealous Sully was of his good looks in the… Fourth grade? Wait.

The entire premise of Monsters University makes that line in Monsters Inc completely impossible. Not to mention they act like they’ve never met the Abominable Snowman when they get banished in Monsters Inc, but the end of Monsters University flips that on it’s head as well.

You can’t blame Monsters Inc too much. I mean, how long was it between the first movie and the second? Time between storytelling is a perfect excuse for inconsistency. Just take a look at X-men. Which one? Oh, take your pick. You can pretty much sit down and watch any two x-men movies and there will probably be something that contradicts something else.  My favorite is “X-men Origins: Wolverine” versus “The Wolverine.” We find out in Origins that Logan had bone-claws, got them fused with adamantium, and then shortly thereafter lost all memory of his life before. But the opening sequence in the Wolverine shows Logan hanging in a well using his bone claws to hold him up. When this scene is mentioned later in the show, Logan seems to remember the occurrence.

inconsistency

photo credit: mememaker.net

Inconsistencies pop up in almost any series, and even in standalone stories. What we say at “once upon a time” might conflict with what we say at “happily ever after.” We’re never going to be able to make that perfect (That’s a recurring theme throughout my blog) but here are some pieces of advice you can try to minimize them.

Style Sheets

I learned about Style Sheets in an editing class I took a few months ago. Basically it’s one piece of paper, or excel document, or whatever works best for your mind, where you write down anything that you might forget. Did you spell your main character’s name Marc or Mark? Write that down. Did your supporting character tell his friend he has a severe peanut allergy? Write it down, because you don’t want him eating a PB&J halfway through the book. (Unless you intend to do a hospital scene shortly thereafter.)

Style sheets are going to help you out in keeping things straight for the novel you’re working on, but if you end up writing a series, make sure to keep your style sheets from book one and two, etc. They will be invaluable. It means you won’t have to go back and read through the first few books while you’re trying to write the next one. That being said, it leads me into my next tip.

Read what you wrote

I know this one seems a bit obvious. But it’s a little more than that. I suppose I should say “read what you wrote, and read it fast.” Don’t skim, because you might skim over the inconsistencies. But before you hit “publish” on that novel, read through the whole book, not with an eye to edit or “fix” it, but with an eye to catch any inconsistencies. It’s incredible how taking a whole afternoon and crashing through your novel, (kind of like one of your addicted readers might do) can help you realize you said one thing in chapter 2 and something else in chapter 28.

And last but not least,

Know your weaknesses

This one I might just be preaching to myself, but I know my weaknesses when it comes to inconsistencies. I might write something on page 87 that says the drive would take seventeen hours to get out to the test site. Perfect. But on page 92, after they’ve done their tests, gotten some lunch, shot the breeze, or whatever, they get in the car to head home and show up just before dinner.

I know I’m awful at timeline stuff. Some people could just put timeline stuff in their style sheet and have no problem. That doesn’t work for me. I invested in a timeline program just last year, and absolutely love it. I can keep track of when things happen, and can even put in notes of how long google says it takes to get from point A to point B. It gives my story a lot more realistic feel to it, when I can say “it took us a day and a half to get to L.A.” rather than just saying, “Sometime later we arrived in L.A.”

So what techniques do you use to keep track of and avoid your inconsistencies? Let me know in the comments below.

Have fun, and enjoy the writing.